ASEC News

Service Learning students make donations for Bigwa fish pond

African Sisters Education Collaborative (ASEC)
Posted on

After the Service Learning trip in May 2012, a service learning student donated funds for a second fish pond at Bigwa.

The Bigwa students’ diet has traditionally consisted primarily of starch foods that have been grown locally including potatoes and root vegetables. The readily available proteins in the geographic area which locals eat are legumes such as beans.

In the interest of improving the Bigwa School’s student body’s health, in 2010 a student from Marywood University’s Nutrition and Dietetics Department was invited to conduct research to identify the nutritional value in the diet provided to students at the Bigwa School. Findings revealed that their diet was heavily starch-based, and that the community would greatly benefit from introducing more proteins into their everyday diet.

In 2011, after having completed a Service Learning trip, one of the students from the ASEC colleges thought of addressing the need to introduce more protein into the diet and donated money for the purchase of a cow to provide milk for the students.

A grant from the GHR foundation provided the funding for a borehole, which could provide a resource of fresh, clean potable water for drinking water.

A grant from the GHR foundation in spring of 2012 provided the funding for a borehole, which could provide the much-needed resource of fresh, clean potable water for drinking but also for growing vegetables and for animals. Sisters involved with the Bigwa school also set out to address the protein nutritional deficit and at that time donated their savings to create a fish pond; with the fish they were able to supplement their diet. However, the fish pond could not accommodate the high number of fish and there was a need for a second one.

The new fish pond was completed in April 2013.

After the Service Learning trip in May 2012, another student donated funds for the second fish pond in order to expand the fish production.  Construction began and it was completed in April 2013. 

Leave a comment »

Share this story:

Keep Reading...

“AMAZING GRACE!”

"It is like a dream for me to see that now I am able to do my work so much more systematically than before. This is the direct result of having attended the SLDI basic computer and finance workshops.

ASEC addresses many concerns of major superiors in Tanzania

Formation and empowering sisters is a priority for many Tanzanian congregations. Through God’s intervention, he touched the hearts of the ASEC founders to lead them toward answering the prayers of our superiors.

ASEC Empowers African Sisters to Build Sustainable Societies

After attending the SLDI Basic Technology and Administration workshops, Sr. Mariana discovers that the training was not only a means to implement educational goals; it's also the key to economic development and sustainability in Africa.

Back to news »

Support the next generation of leaders

Consider supporting a U.S. student or sister the unique opporunity to participate in Service Learning for only $500.

Donate Now »