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Donor retention strategies to win donor confidence

African Sisters Education Collaborative (ASEC)

Members of a farmer support group pose with Sr. Teresa for a photo. She spearheaded a project to train nearly 50 farmers in new farming technology to help reduce food shortages in Gwaza Village in Dedza, Malawi. Of course, Sr. Teresa sent this photo along to funder of this project so they could see the impact their donation has made. This is key to donor retention.

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Sr. Teresa shares how she won the confidence of her donors and how donor retention plays an important role in receiving funding for multiple projects that can benefit the community.

Sr. Teresa Mulenga of Malawi sees problems and creates solutions to correct them. She wanted to find funds for her projects however she found herself struggling to create proposals for donors because she lacked the skills to do so. After graduating from ASEC’s Sisters Leadership Development Initiative (SLDI) program, Sr. Teresa acquired the skills she needed to create proposals, manage budgets and keep accurate financial records.

“The skills I got through ASEC helped my community to win donor confidence and get more funding,” says Sr. Teresa.

Keys to donor retention

  • stay in constant communication with donors
  • provide financial reports and photographs
  • show your donor the progression of the project
  • make the donor aware of any problems or challenges you are facing
  • be accountable and give accurate and honest information
  • find ways to self-sustain your project to win your donor's continued support

Sr. Teresa learned in order to win donor confidence she must stay in constant communication with them by means of financial reports as well as photographs. She adds that donors like to see the progression of the projects and be aware of  any challenges the donee is facing. She notes it is important to be accountable and to give the most accurate and honest information on expenditures. She also believes an important part of retaining donor confidence is making the project self-sustainable so the donor is not continually funding the same project. The ability to be creative is also important, because in order to retain the donor after the project is completed, you’ll need to thing of a new idea and project for your happy funder to support.

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Graduating from the SLDI program and working as ASEC's Programs Coordinator in Malawi, Sr. Teresa has the confidence and facilitation skills to stand up in front of a group and teach effectively. Thanks for her skills in donor retention, the proceeds from her funded pig project will provide HIV/AIDS support in the Kamtande Village in Malawi.

Graduating from the SLDI program and working as ASEC's Programs Coordinator in Malawi, Sr. Teresa has the confidence and facilitation skills to stand up in front of a group and teach effectively. Thanks for her skills in donor retention, the proceeds from her funded pig project will provide HIV/AIDS support in the Kamtande Village in Malawi.

Multiple projects through one donor

Recently, Sr. Teresa spearheaded a project on food sustainability which funds farmers in the Gwaza Village in Dedza, Malawi. The project aims to train 49 farmers in new technologies that will help reduce food shortages.  

She also found donors to fund a pig project the proceeds of which will help provide HIV/AIDS support in the Kamtande Village.  

Sr. Teresa believes that an indicator of winning donor confidence is their continued support.  The founder of Mirjam Foundation, one of the Teresian Sisters and one of Sr. Teresa’s donors stated

“I am really impressed with the work the Teresian Sisters community is doing...I am going to lobby for more funding to support the projects”.

Through the skills she learned in the SLDI program, Sr. Teresa was able to win the confidence of her donors, allowing her to retain them for longer and get funding for multiple projects that will impact her community.

You can make a difference for an entire community in Africa.

ASEC's programs teach African sisters how to write grants, manage finances, initiate and lead community projects and win donor confidence. With the gift of education, you can help more sisters gain skills that will lead to self-sustainability in Africa.

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This article is addressing the following UN Sustainable Development Goal(s):

End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all Sustainable Cities and Communities Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development
Sr. Teresa Mulenga, TS


Author
Programs Coordinator – Malawi  


Editor
Administrative Assistant  

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